Monthly Archives: May 2012

What influenced Steve Reich?

Minimalist composer Steve Reich is one of the headliners of BLOC (July, 6th and 7th in London) and shares the bill with an illustrious circle of artists like Richie Hawtin, Flying Lotus, Amon Tobin and Snoop Dogg.  In this video he talks about how drumming from Ghana and Balinese music influenced his compositions and mentions a new piece based on two Radiohead songs.

He  goes into much detail about how he incorporated principles  of musical practice from Ghana and Indonesia into Music for 18 Musicians. Listen to exactly that below:

via: The Quietus

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Monkey music

Monkey see, monkey do… with synthesizers.

via: Nerdcore

#138

Bob Moog would have turned 78 today.  The perfect day to check out the brilliant  MOOG – a film by HANS FJELLESTADT.

A Brief History of John Baldessari

The Godfather of Conceptual Art, a master of appropration, a surrealist for the digital age or: the guy that put dots over people´s faces.

via: Laughing Squid

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via: Das Kraftfuttermischwerk

Source of Uncertainty

Source of Uncertainty celebrates the Buchla synthesizer and DIY modular synthesis. This is the wonderful (draft of a) poster for the events.

via: Create Digital Music

A coloured history of techno

With Colour Tracks, German producer Benjamin Brunn offers a sweet guidance system on coloured vinyl. It enables the listener not only to navigate through the different tracks on the record, but also through its different musical styles.

The limited edition of Colour Tracks on 4×12″ records are as much a navigation system as a tool: using the colour key, DJs can decide which form of techno they want to choose. The Colour Tracks strike eyes and ears equally and cover the full range of electronic music in 19 tracks. By overcoming a major technical challenge it was for the first time possible to precisely tailor the design of a vinyl record to the music it contains. Each track is composed by Brunn and each style is visualized through the allocation of a colour. Every colour stands for one electronic genre and every track is precisely as long as the strip of colour is wide. Included in the booklet is the 13-piece colour chart and information about each track (genre, tempo, how it was made etc.) as well as an interview with the artist. (benjaminbrunn.com)

via: E-BEATS